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Special Sessions


Special Session 1
Making the Case: Calculating the Financial Impact from your TPM Efforts

Wayne Marhelski, President
3V Group

New initiatives need management buy-in in order to take root. A good way to obtain that buy-in is to be able to provide information on the effort’s financial impacts. In this session we’ll explore the potential impact that a TPM program can have on a company’s finances. This will be done in an easy to follow and understand process that you will then be able to take back and apply in your own company; no accounting degree required. Learn about the financial areas impacted by the elements that make up OEE. The goal of this session is to give you the knowledge necessary to speak with those in the decision making role, in the language they focus on….money.

Wayne Marhelski has been involved in the manufacturing sector for over 20 years across a wide variety of industries. Starting out as a Manufacturing Engineer after time in the United States Air Force, he worked his way up through the ranks where he held multiple positions at the Vice President level in both operations and supply chain. His primary concentration has been in taking underperforming manufacturing companies, and through the use of Lean, has transformed the operations and positioned the businesses for greater profitability and growth. As a consultant, Wayne has further expanded his application of Lean, Operations Management and Supply Chain Management for companies in the Oil & Gas, Aerospace, Composites, and Automotive industries on a global scale. His work also includes M & A (Mergers and Acquisitions), and due diligence activities. Wayne holds a Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering, along with an MBA in Accounting and Finance. In addition to his education, Wayne is a Certified Supply Chain Professional (CSCP), with additional certifications in Lean, and Six Sigma. He is currently the President of the 3V Group, which continues his focus on assisting under-performing and private equity owned businesses to reach their full potential.

Agenda at a Glance






Special Session 2
Total Asset Management; Leveraging TPM for Maximum Strategic Advantage - Part 1

Thomas Heiserman, Principal
Maintenance Solutions Group

With fast-moving global markets, disruptions in distribution channels, and easy spread of know-how, companies need to do more than maintain assets. They need to manage them. Whether or not your organization is interested in obtaining ISO-55000 certification, there is much to be gained from adopting the process outlined in the standard. In the first of this two-part session, we will look at the origins of the standard, published in January of 2014 and look at the business case for embracing it. Discover the benefits that can be realized when asset care –typically an operational effort becomes asset management – a strategic initiative. Discussion will focus on cradle to grave asset management process and the leadership and culture change needed to support it.

Tom Heiserman is an international maintenance consultant with experience assisting organizations throughout the Global 1000. Tom started his career in industry as TPM Coordinator for Honeywell and corporate TPM Integration Team Representative for Chrysler Stamping. As a consultant, Tom has assisted many organizations including British Gas with Maintenance Strategic Planning, British Petroleum in continuous improvement, SABIC in Asset Maintenance Work Process Development to name a few. His coaching for British Gas resulted in their achievement of World-Class/Best in Class KPI metrics. Thomas has nearly three decades as a tradesman, has been published in Maintenance Technology magazine, and has worked as an instructor in the Apprenticeship Curriculum for several community colleges. His approach to client engagements ensures improvement efforts are aligned with overall organizational goals resulting in tangible improvements in safety, risk reduction, productivity, reliability, profitability and asset uptime.

Agenda at a Glance






Special Session 3
One Foot in the Old and One in the New; Techniques for Navigating the Transition from Current to Future State

Wayne Marhelski, President
3V Group

Every TPM journey has a transitional period where the old and new approaches can clash. It may be due to not allocating the necessary time, resource constraints, cultural habits, or establishing new disciplines that must be mastered. During this session we'll talk about that transitional period where we move from tools to rules. Topics will include identifying social and technical constraints, prioritization and defining counter-measures, leaderships role and responsibility, leader Standard work and routines, visual management (aka workplace quality stations), and the significance of daily accountability.

Wayne Marhelski has been involved in the manufacturing sector for over 20 years across a wide variety of industries. Starting out as a Manufacturing Engineer after time in the United States Air Force, he worked his way up through the ranks where he held multiple positions at the Vice President level in both operations and supply chain. His primary concentration has been in taking underperforming manufacturing companies, and through the use of Lean, has transformed the operations and positioned the businesses for greater profitability and growth. As a consultant, Wayne has further expanded his application of Lean, Operations Management and Supply Chain Management for companies in the Oil & Gas, Aerospace, Composites, and Automotive industries on a global scale. His work also includes M & A (Mergers and Acquisitions), and due diligence activities. Wayne holds a Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering, along with an MBA in Accounting and Finance. In addition to his education, Wayne is a Certified Supply Chain Professional (CSCP), with additional certifications in Lean, and Six Sigma. He is currently the President of the 3V Group, which continues his focus on assisting under-performing and private equity owned businesses to reach their full potential.

Agenda at a Glance






Special Session 4
Total Asset Management; Leveraging TPM for Maximum Strategic Advantage - Part 2

Thomas Heiserman, Principal
Maintenance Solutions

How does TPM fit into an ISO 55000 environment? Do we scrap TPM in favor of 55000? In part two of this session we will answer these questions and more. From autonomous maintenance to early equipment management, the eight pillars of TPM encompass a comprehensive, proactive approach for managing and maintaining physical assets to contribute maximum value over their life cycle. Learn how TPM supports ISO55000 and how to leverage them both for maximum strategic advantage.

Tom Heiserman is an international maintenance consultant with experience assisting organizations throughout the Global 1000. Tom started his career in industry as TPM Coordinator for Honeywell and corporate TPM Integration Team Representative for Chrysler Stamping. As a consultant, Tom has assisted many organizations including British Gas with Maintenance Strategic Planning, British Petroleum in continuous improvement, SABIC in Asset Maintenance Work Process Development to name a few. His coaching for British Gas resulted in their achievement of World-Class/Best in Class KPI metrics. Thomas has nearly three decades as a tradesman, has been published in Maintenance Technology magazine, and has worked as an instructor in the Apprenticeship Curriculum for several community colleges. His approach to client engagements ensures improvement efforts are aligned with overall organizational goals resulting in tangible improvements in safety, risk reduction, productivity, reliability, profitability and asset uptime.

Agenda at a Glance






Special Session 5
TPM and Sustainability: Reducing your Carbon Footprint

Ellis New, Senior Consultant
Productivity Inc.

In this special session we will explore how the TPM Pillars can be used in collaboration with your company’s EHS initiatives to drive toward zero environmental losses. Learn how to effectively link TPM and EHS to reduce energy, chemical, materials, and water wastes; eliminate safety incidents and hazardous spills; ensure compliance; and maximize improvement opportunities. According to the principle of “zero failures,” abnormalities that go unnoticed or are ignored eventually lead to some type of failure. With the information covered in this session, you can start applying the principles of zero waste and zero failures through TPM to accelerate progress toward your company’s strategic energy and sustainability goals.

Ellis New has been a Senior Management Consultant – Project Manager with Productivity Inc. for more than fifteen years, where he worked directly with originators and implementers of nationally and internationally recognized improvement strategies. Ellis started his career with Pirelli Cable Corporation, where he subsequently spent the 10 years playing a key role in the company’s process improvement initiatives, both at the plant and corporate level. Today, Ellis continues to advance the principles of TPM and Lean through ongoing client engagements with companies found throughout the Fortune 500 and Global 1000. Ellis is a faculty member/instructor at The Ohio State University’s Fisher College of Business Masters of Operational Excellence, TPM Manager Certification Program and Lean Manager Certification Programs.

Agenda at a Glance






Case Studies


Case Study 1
Quality and TPM Working Together to Eliminate Defects

Brian D. Dunn, OE – East Region TPM Manager

Coca-Cola Refreshments

Our goal of achieving zero quality defects required a total shift in thinking – from a conventional attempt to inspect quality into our product /process, to an approach where all known conditions affecting quality are measured, and preventive action is taken before conditions exceed the stated range. The Quality Maintenance (QM) pillar of TPM prescribes the establishment of equipment conditions that deliver zero-defect conditions. Preventing quality defects by keeping those conditions within a standard range of values is how the Autonomous Maintenance (AM) and Quality Maintenance (QM) pillars work together to stop the madness of trying to inspect quality into a product/process. In this session hear about Coca-Cola’s continuing pursuit of achieving zero quality defects through the application of these two TPM Pillars.

Brian Dunn is OE - East Region TPM Manager at Coca-Cola Refreshments, where he is accountable for the development and implementation of CCR North America’s TPM Program and accountable for leading 23 manufacturing facilities in building the capabilities to deliver process improvement. He is passionate about safety, food safety, and eliminating waste, and he has successfully improved productivity and customer satisfaction while driving and sustaining multi-million dollar reductions in operating costs. Brian’s background includes engineering, maintenance, production, and facilities management at leading companies in the food and beverage industry, and he holds an MBA from Colorado State University and a bachelor’s in business from Middle Tennessee State University.

Agenda at a Glance






Case Study 2
Global Best Practices, a Vision for Maintenance & Reliability

Jerry Todd, Manager of Manufacturing Engineering
MSA Safety

In this session discover the benefits of benchmarking. Benchmarking provides a wealth of information that can help you clearly define current state, identify program gaps and develop a site specific action plan to move your program forward. Benchmarking, whether internal or external, is an excellent gauge for MRO (maintenance, repair, and overhaul). In this session, Jerry will present a case study detailing his organization’s effort to benchmark their global maintenance activities. The presentation will cover their maintenance self-assessment and gap analysis and the resulting improvement plans for their manufacturing facilities. With the aim of achieving collective business results, this centralized approach to maintenance management ensures overall MRO program effectiveness while at the same time accommodating specific site rollouts that take into account sensitivity to site size, lean maturity, and culture. Whether your operation is global or national, multi-plant or single facility, you’ll discover how benchmarking can provide new perspective and direction for your existing efforts.

Jerry Todd is the Manager of Manufacturing Engineering for MSA Safety, a global leader in the development, manufacture and supply of safety products that protect people and facility infrastructures. He received his Master of Business Administration at the University of Pittsburgh. He is also a 6 Sigma Black Belt and Certified Lean Manufacturing Practitioner. Jerry’s leadership experience includes responsibilities for Manufacturing, Engineering and Service. He repatriated from South Africa in 2012 after a five year assignment there where he established a Sub-Saharan Service Hub, along with commissioning several satellite service centers in South Africa, Nigeria, Zambia, and Namibia.

Agenda at a Glance






Case Study 3
Lessons Learned in a Global TPM Standardization Effort

Matt Swain, Senior Lean Leader
Littelfuse, Inc.

Three and a half years ago, a team of lean leaders and maintenance managers determined that standard work for Littelfuse TPM was critical to the company’s success. Since then, Littelfuse has made tremendous progress. They’ve launched (and in some cases completed) ambitious efforts to overhaul 100% of the equipment to “like new” or “better than new” status in facilities that have 600+ complex machines and develop a “TPM Plan for Every Plant” that extends through 2015. This presentation will outline the eight aspects of Littelfuse Lean Enterprise TPM; lessons captured about the pain points in standardization efforts—and how to avoid them; and critical aspects of starting and continuing a TPM rollout, including how to get executive buy-in, how to prioritize, and the key points and successes of the “overhauling” kaizen blitz.

Matt Swain’s career has spanned almost two decades, during which he has accumulated impressive credentials in TPM. In his current role as Senior Lean Leader with Littelfuse, the world’s leading manufacturer of circuit protection devices, Matt spearheads the global initiative to transform the corporation’s approach to TPM. His hands-on style of teaching and training the TPM methodology is yielding impressive results across the company’s 12 manufacturing locations on 3 continents. Prior to joining Littelfuse, Matt held leadership positions in design, engineering, and maintenance with several world-class corporations, including Honeywell and Finisar. Matt’s academic credentials support his passion for TPM and include a Master’s in Manufacturing Systems Management, a Bachelor’s in Mechanical Engineering and certifications in lean and six sigma.

Agenda at a Glance







Case Study 4
The Maintenance Boot Camp

Phil Ward, President
BSH Development, LLC

Frustrated with lackluster results after months of training and maintenance improvement efforts, it became apparent that a new approach would be necessary to achieve the organization’s goals. Phil was asked to take the lead in revamping the program. He developed the Maintenance Boot Camp, focused on education and standardization of maintenance tasks. In this session, learn how this high volume manufacturer improved the average equipment availability across 400 machines by 7 percent in 9 months and improved MTBF and cycle time while reducing PM time. This session will cover the what, how and why -- from structure and strategy to benefits and results -- of this innovative approach to maintenance improvement.

Phil Ward started his career at Intel Corporation where he held diverse positions as Manufacturing Manager, Lean Leader, TPM Manager, and Technical Training manager in locations in both the U. S. and Latin America. He was responsible for the execution of continuous improvement in safety, quality, output, cost and personal development. He developed, trained, and deployed the Equipment Maintenance Standardization Boot Camp Process that was recognized as a “Breakthrough Methodology” at the 2008 Intel Manufacturing Excellence Conference. Today, Phil is President of BSH Development, LLC where he continues to provide lean and TPM consulting services.

Agenda at a Glance







Case Study 6
3P in Action; Equipment, Process, and People

Jerry Todd, Manager of Manufacturing Engineering
MSA Safety

When MSA Safety was working to launch a new and innovative state-of-the-art product and develop the manufacturing process to create it, they decided to build equipment maintainability into the process right from the start. They realized that equipment and process design, coupled with a linkage to maintenance skills, is critical for preventing waste and optimizing process reliability. In this presentation, Jerry talks about the multi-year manufacturing production readiness project that’s overarching theme, relative to equipment commissioning, were safety and reliability. Hear details of the project and how it resulted in the adoption of new processes for manufacturing and testing equipment acceptance, maintenance routines, and reliability measures. The case study will also highlight the team’s assessment of critical maintenance skills and the subsequent development and deployment of a new job progression system for maintenance craft associates.

Jerry Todd is the Manager of Manufacturing Engineering for MSA Safety, a global leader in the development, manufacture and supply of safety products that protect people and facility infrastructures. He received his Master of Business Administration at the University of Pittsburgh. He is also a 6 Sigma Black Belt and Certified Lean Manufacturing Practitioner. Jerry’s leadership experience includes responsibilities for Manufacturing, Engineering and Service. He repatriated from South Africa in 2012 after a five year assignment there where he established a Sub-Saharan Service Hub, along with commissioning several satellite service centers in South Africa, Nigeria, Zambia, and Namibia.

Agenda at a Glance







Case Study 7
Focusing in on Losses – Focused Improvement and Autonomous Maintenance Working Together to Eliminate Minor Stops

Barry Goen, Operational Excellence & TPM Manager
Coca-Cola Refreshments

A well-positioned Autonomous Maintenance (AM) program can deliver rapid reductions in the Six Big Losses. However, to achieve even greater loss reductions, steer your AM teams to incorporate Focused Improvement (FI) as part of their AM activities. In this session hear how Coca-Cola AM teams are using the Five Core Tools of FI to enhance their AM activities and drastically reduce equipment losses.

Barry Goen has over 35 years in manufacturing management with an emphasis on production, operations management, continuous improvement, and TPM methodologies. He is presently with the Coca-Cola National Implementation Team which is responsible for TPM implementation nationwide. Prior to joining Coca Cola he spent 22 years with Unilever in the Personal Care and Ice Cream Facilities. He held various roles in front line manufacturing management and global and regional TPM implementation as a member of their plant TPM Team. He is a certified JIPM TPM Instructor.

Agenda at a Glance























Brian D. Dunn





















Barry Goen





















Tom Heiserman





















Ellis New





















Jerry Todd





















Matt Swain





















Wayne Marhelski
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